Evaluation Planning & Management 

Planning for the conduction of an evaluation should incorporate project management practices. Developing a clear work plan, with realistic timeframes, clear deliverables and milestones is key for ensuring the evaluation remains on-track to achieve its intended results. This section outlines how to: (i) create an evaluation work plan and budget; (ii) determine roles and responsibilities; and (iii) plan for risks.

Resources

  • Evaluation Work Plan (Better Evaluation) – An evaluation work plan involves the development of clear timeframes, deliverables and milestones. It should state who is accountable for different phases and activities of the evaluation and include risk management strategies and flexibility to deal with unforseen events without compromising the timeframe or methodology.
  • Evaluation Toolkit: Sample Budget (Better Evaluation) – This is a straightforward budget example that lists costs associated with four basic expenditure categories: staffing, materials and supplies, equipment and travel.
  • Guide d’évaluation de project à l’intention des organismes sans but lucrative: Méthodes et étapes foundametales pour procéder à l’évaluation de projects – This guide was designed to help charities and non-profit organizations conduct accurate and relevant project evaluations, and to present and use the results effectively. The main purpose is to help organizations who want to evaluate their own projects and to integrate evaluation into their project management and strategic development. (French resource)

Tools

  •  Check back – new tools will be added regularly

Data Collection

There are numerous methods to collect the information you need to answer your evaluation questions, both qualitative and quantitative. This section of the toolkit will help you to decide what data collection methods are most appropriate for your evaluation.

Resources

  •  Collect and/or Retrieve Data (Better Evaluation) -This task focuses on ways to collect and/or retrieve data about activities, results, context and other factors. It is important to consider the type of information you want to gather from your participants and the ways you will analyze that information, before you choose your option.
  • Selecting Data collection Methods (CDC) – Once you have clear and focused evaluation questions, the next step is to decide from where/ whom you will get the data to answer your evaluation questions. Example data sources include documents, individuals, and observations. Then you can decide on which data collection methods to use and should consider the following when selecting your methods.
  • Data Collection Methods for Program Evaluation: Interviews (CDC) – This brief is about interviewing as a data collection method for evaluation. This brief includes a basic overview of the interview method; when to use it; how to plan and conduct it; and its advantages and disadvantages. This brief focuses on interviewing individuals.
  • Data Collection Methods for Program Evaluation: Focus Groups (CDC) – This brief is about focus groups as a data collection method for evaluation. This brief includes a basic overview of focus groups; when to use them; how to plan and conduct them; and their advantages and disadvantages.
  • Data Collection Methods for Program Evaluation: Questionnaires (CDC) – This brief is about questionnaires as a data collection method for evaluation. The brief includes a basic overview of questionnaires; when to use them; how to plan and develop them; and their advantages and disadvantages.
  • Data Collection Methods for Evaluation: Document Review (CDC) – This brief describes document review as a data collection method for evaluation. It includes a basic overview of document review; when to use it; how to plan and conduct it; and its advantages and disadvantages.
  • Data Collection Methods for Program Evaluation: Observation (CDC) – This brief is about observation as a data collection method for evaluation. It includes a basic overview of observation; when to use it; how to plan and conduct it; and its advantages and disadvantages.
  • Collecting Evaluation Data: Surveys (University of Wisconsin-Extension) – This manual is written to help community-based educators improve their practice with survey development.

Tools

  •  Check back – new tools will be added regularly

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